The Wiffle Ball Strike Zone

Birthday gifts are always difficult to buy, especially as we get older. My brother and I still exchange presents every year, but usually we make it easy on each other with a one item wish list. Fortunately enough, I had a great idea hidden in my back pocket for this year’s present.

During my brother’s college years, I have reason to believe that Conor spent more time playing wiffle ball than studying for class. And every year at our Easter picnic, Conor manages to round up the troops for a rousing game of home run derby. Due to his random love of wiffleball, I decided that my (almost thirty but going on thirteen) brother needed a custom wiffle ball strike zone for his birthday.

Want to make one for your brother too? He might think you are the coolest sister ever.

How to Make a Wiffle Ball Strike Zone

Dimensions provided by this really cool twelve year old boy

Materials

  • 4 PVC elbows
  • 4 PVC T’s
  • Sheet metal
  • 10-15 Zip ties
  • 2 lengths of PVC pipe
  • Chalkboard spray Paint
  • Spray paint, color of choice
  • Metal Sheers
  • Hack Saw
  • PVC primer and glue

Dimensions

Top: 19 ¾ inch

Right and Left Sides: 22 ½ inches each

Bottom: 9 inch middle, two 2 ½ inch pieces to go between elbows and t’s

Legs: 11 inches each

Base: 4 pieces of leftover PVC pipe, keep equal but length is up to you

Sheet metal 22 ¼ by 19 ¼

 

To start, find a handy friend that has a rooftop deck meant for messy projects.

Cut the PVC pipe to the above lengths with the hack saw.

Cut the sheet metal to the aforementioned dimensions with your metal sheers. Puncture at least two holes on each edge of the metal, making sure to be VERY careful! This metal can easily slice you.

Piece your PVC pipes together with the elbows and T’s, as shown below.

Now that you have the frame as you want it, pull the pieces apart and put the PVC primer then glue on. Stick the pieces back together. The only pieces you should not glue together are the bottom T’s to the base legs, so you can detach for carrying purposes (they are not shown here for that reason).

Your base is glued together and flattened, so now spray paint whatever color you want. How about caution cone orange?

Spray paint that sheet metal while you are at it. Black chalkboard paint anyone?

Decorate the sheet metal as you wish. I printed out some letters and made stencils to paint on the metal. “Home Run Derby” on the front and “Score”on the back. That way you can keep track of you score on the chalkboard. Fancy, huh?

Time to put it all together! Slide your zip ties through the holes in the sheet metal and attach them to the sides of the frame. I added a little bit of hot glue to cover the sheet metal holes since they were still rather sharp.

Lookie what we got here? The SF Giants would be proud of my twenty nine year old, wiffle ball loving brother.

Noah might have one upped me on his birthday present to his dad. He went number two in the potty for the first time that day. That little guy…always stealing the show somehow.

Ready??

Play Ball!

Lovely comments

  1. Michael Poplawski says

    Great page on a project that I have in mind right now!

    One question I have: would there be a way to make the height of the support legs adjustable, or even the height of the strike zone itself? I’ll be playing with players of different heights

    I love the idea of the chalkboard paint, I didn’t even realize something like that existed!

    • says

      Glad this will help you! I’m not really sure how to make it adjustable, but you can definitely make the height taller or shorter. Maybe you can have 3 sets of heights that you can interchange? Just be sure to not glue the PVC pipe to the T’s so you can interchange the different sized PVC pipe.

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